Virgin Interactive Archive

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Prince of Persia (NES)

Prince of Persia
Prince of Persia has been ported to just about everything. The NES version is decent, but probably not the best of the home console ports.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Another World (Out of this World)

Out of This World
Another World is a landmark game from the early 90s, best remembered for its blend of cinematic action and puzzles. The US release was called Out of this World, and has some ghastly ass box art.

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Retro Gaming Theatre – Aladdin (Mega Drive)

Aladdin was one of the biggest surprises of 1993 – an honest to god high quality licensed game. Virgin, Disney and Sega teamed up to develop and promote the product, and as a result, it was one of the best looking, playing and selling games on the Mega Drive.

Our Retro Gaming Theatre playthrough gives you a sample of the first few stages on the game.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: RoboCop vs. The Terminator


The 1992 Dark Horse comic book mini-series RoboCop vs. The Terminator had video game potential written all over it, so Virgin Interactive snapped the rights up and did exactly that. While the game released across six formats, there are four distinct versions, owing to the fact that Virgin assigned four different developers to the task of producing the game.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Mega lo Mania (Tyrants: Fight Through Time)

Tyrants Fight Through Time USA
Mega lo Mania, known as Tyrants: Fight Through Time in North America (hence the name in the ad), is an early real-time strategy game developed by Sensible Software. Players compete with 3 other warlords across the ages for the right to rule over increasingly larger lands. Your soldiers start off with nothing but sticks and stones, but after a few levels you’ll be rocking nukes. Mega lo Mania‘s console release was pretty low profile, which is probably why it tends to get overlooked outside of Amiga fan groups.

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EA to release Command & Conquer: The Ultimate Collection


If you thought Command & Conquer: The First Decade was a good deal, wait til you get a load of Command & Conquer: The Ultimate Collection, due to hit stores and EA’s Origin service in October.

For $US49.99 or £24.99 (no AU price yet), you get the following Command & Conquer games:
Command & Conquer
Command & Conquer: The Covert Operations
Command & Conquer: Red Alert
Command & Conquer: Red Alert – Counterstrike
Command & Conquer: Red Alert – The Aftermath
Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun
Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun – Firestorm
Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2
Command & Conquer: Red Alert – Yuri’s Revenge
Command & Conquer: Renegade
Command & Conquer: Generals
Command & Conquer: Generals – Zero Hour
Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars
Command & Conquer 3: Kane’s Wrath
Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3
Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3 – Uprising
Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight

That’s a lot of Command & Conquer – no Sole Survivor, though!

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Video Game Ad of the Day: The Jungle Book


After the smashing success of Aladdin on the Mega Drive, Disney and Virgin Interactive teamed up to produce a game based on The Jungle Book. However, the talent behind Aladdin had moved on to start Shiny Entertainment, so it wasn’t nearly as good.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Chuck Rock


Chuck Rock is one of those games that originated on the Amiga that Amiga fans think is the bees knees, and nobody else gives a hoot about because there were far better games on the consoles.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Dune 2000


Dune 2000 was a partial remake, partial reimagining of Westwood’s classic Dune II. It was an attempt by Westwood to modernise Dune II, by adding features like unit balance and full motion video cutscenes (starring John Rhys-Davies among others) to the formula, but it was not well received.

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Video Game Ad of the Day: Disney’s Aladdin

A non-crappy licensed game from the 16-bit era.

Disney’s Aladdin was a combined effort between Sega, Virgin and Disney, originally released for the Mega Drive for the 1993 holiday season. The game boasts animation on an entirely different level to everything else on the system, thanks to a technique called Digicel, which could compress data from animators’ drawings into the limited storage capacity of the Mega Drive cartridges. It is the second highest selling game on the system.